Factors that contribute to dissatisfaction at work. In the online survey

Factors that contribute to dissatisfaction at work. In the Biotin-VAD-FMK web online survey, the first written question explored what wellness programs or initiatives at the institution physicians had heard of and/or used, and this was also typically the first topic brought up once group discussions began. Although [email protected], which serves as the overarching health and wellness resource for Stanford University, emerged as the most widely known and most utilized program, the majority of participating physicians were unaware of any wellness offerings. Physicians were poorly informed about the range of available resources, and dissemination of information appeared relatively ineffective at the time of study. Moreover, physicians expressed that they had limited practical access to wellness resources, because of the time slots at which activities were offered, because of lack of protected time for such activities, and because of distance from their work location. Representative quotes illustrate this in physicians’ own voices: ?“I am aware of wellness programs such as a trainer available at the gym, a nutritionist available, and incentives for wellness. I have not had time to take advantage of any programs.” ?“I am familiar with many of their programs but unable to take advantage of any due to high work load and extremely limited flexibility of work schedule.” ?“Being told by a non-physician to “go for walks on my lunch hour” just illustrates the enormous chasm between my reality and the platitudes.” The second question was designed to explore what AMG9810 price motivated participating physicians. Factors that are intrinsic to physicians’ work itself dominated work motivation. These factors can be summarized in the unifying theme of contribution, with its categories ofSchrijver et al. (2016), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.9/meaningful work, patient care, teaching, scientific discovery, self-motivation and career fit (Table 1). Thus, Stanford physicians seemed to be very well-aligned with the institutional Mission (“to care, to educate, to discover”), which is reflected in the following comments: ?“What motivates me at work is the same motivation that drove me to seek the medical profession: the sense that my daily work would have a positive impact on another individual and that my actions are helpful to others; hence my satisfaction is internal.” ?“Meaningful work. I continue to work toward achieving significant work that is both meaningful to me personally and impactful on a broader scale.” ?“Knowing that I am doing the best possible work for the patients.” ?“Making new clinical discoveries that will enhance the care of patients.” ?“Intellectual stimulation and the challenge of new problems.” When asked in the third question about the barriers they perceived to work-related wellness, issues surrounding meaning of work or contribution were notably absent. Instead, physicians indicated that factors extrinsic to their immediate professional activities dominated the risk of perceived barriers to work related wellness (Table 1). Ways and means were a priority, because, as participants expressed, physicians require adequate resources to carry out their responsibilities and to provide optimal patient care. Concerns included facilitation of documentation, including the time commitment currently required for charting in the electronic medical record and for documenting billing information. Physicians also had a sense of limited control over their practice envir.Factors that contribute to dissatisfaction at work. In the online survey, the first written question explored what wellness programs or initiatives at the institution physicians had heard of and/or used, and this was also typically the first topic brought up once group discussions began. Although [email protected], which serves as the overarching health and wellness resource for Stanford University, emerged as the most widely known and most utilized program, the majority of participating physicians were unaware of any wellness offerings. Physicians were poorly informed about the range of available resources, and dissemination of information appeared relatively ineffective at the time of study. Moreover, physicians expressed that they had limited practical access to wellness resources, because of the time slots at which activities were offered, because of lack of protected time for such activities, and because of distance from their work location. Representative quotes illustrate this in physicians’ own voices: ?“I am aware of wellness programs such as a trainer available at the gym, a nutritionist available, and incentives for wellness. I have not had time to take advantage of any programs.” ?“I am familiar with many of their programs but unable to take advantage of any due to high work load and extremely limited flexibility of work schedule.” ?“Being told by a non-physician to “go for walks on my lunch hour” just illustrates the enormous chasm between my reality and the platitudes.” The second question was designed to explore what motivated participating physicians. Factors that are intrinsic to physicians’ work itself dominated work motivation. These factors can be summarized in the unifying theme of contribution, with its categories ofSchrijver et al. (2016), PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.9/meaningful work, patient care, teaching, scientific discovery, self-motivation and career fit (Table 1). Thus, Stanford physicians seemed to be very well-aligned with the institutional Mission (“to care, to educate, to discover”), which is reflected in the following comments: ?“What motivates me at work is the same motivation that drove me to seek the medical profession: the sense that my daily work would have a positive impact on another individual and that my actions are helpful to others; hence my satisfaction is internal.” ?“Meaningful work. I continue to work toward achieving significant work that is both meaningful to me personally and impactful on a broader scale.” ?“Knowing that I am doing the best possible work for the patients.” ?“Making new clinical discoveries that will enhance the care of patients.” ?“Intellectual stimulation and the challenge of new problems.” When asked in the third question about the barriers they perceived to work-related wellness, issues surrounding meaning of work or contribution were notably absent. Instead, physicians indicated that factors extrinsic to their immediate professional activities dominated the risk of perceived barriers to work related wellness (Table 1). Ways and means were a priority, because, as participants expressed, physicians require adequate resources to carry out their responsibilities and to provide optimal patient care. Concerns included facilitation of documentation, including the time commitment currently required for charting in the electronic medical record and for documenting billing information. Physicians also had a sense of limited control over their practice envir.