Tion as seen in a variety of birds and fish [60,61,62], when

Tion as seen in a variety of birds and fish [60,61,62], when there is a preference for novel over resident females [63], when female fertility is correlated with her body size [64] and/or choice may be based on genetic relatedness [65]. Here, we describe the first case of male mate choice in a marsupial to our knowledge, with male antechinus appearing disinterested in some females and ignoring their efforts to gain attention. Males prefer novel females rather than familiar previously-mated females in green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis; [64]), but familiarity with the female did not appear to influence male mate choice in the agile antechinus. Males re-mated with the same females if they stayed with them or re-entered the compartment. This was unexpected as males have a relatively small and finite number of spermatozoa available for insemination [66] and may be expected to maximise the number of females inseminated to increase their siring success. Male mate choice also did not appear to be affected by his level of genetic relatedness to the female nor by her fertility status which can be an influence in some species [67]. In oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus rhoads), males paired with preferred females had a greater siring success than those paired with non-preferred females based on compatibility of mates [68]. Here, females that were rejected by some males were accepted by others and successfully produced young, suggesting compatibility, rather than the fertility or attractiveness of the female, affected male choice. Female agonistic behaviour did not appear to deter males, a similar observation to that made by Shimmin et al. [37], and female body mass also did not appear to influence male choice or female reproductive success in this experiment with the lightest and heaviest females mating and no differences in weight between females that did and did not produce young. The reason(s) for the preference by male agile antechinus of certain females over others is not clear. The role of male mate choice and its effects on breeding success in the agile antechinus and other species warrants further examination. This research has provided new and important insights into the effects of genetic relatedness and female mate choice on siring success. It also provides new knowledge about the unusual mating system of the agile antechinus. Future studies of mate choice and its effects on reproductive success will shed light on the evolution of the mating system of the agile antechinus, which provides an interesting and useful paradigm for studies in other related species.AcknowledgmentsWe thank Michael Magrath for his assistance with statistics and the preparation of the ABT-737 dose manuscript.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: MLP SJW PDT-S. Performed the experiments: MLP. Analyzed the data: MLP SJW PDT-S LS. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: MLP.PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/WP1066MedChemExpress WP1066 journal.pone.0122381 April 29,13 /Mate Choice and Multiple Mating in AntechinusWrote the paper: MLP. Supervised MLP’s PhD research: SJW PDT-S LS. Edited the manuscript: SJW PDT-S LS
Health-related stigma is defined by Weiss and colleagues[1] as “a social process, experienced or anticipated, characterized by exclusion, rejection, blame or devaluation that results fromPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122478 April 21,1 /Stigma in Young Adults with Narcolepsyexperience, perception or reasonable anticipation of an adverse social judgment about a perso.Tion as seen in a variety of birds and fish [60,61,62], when there is a preference for novel over resident females [63], when female fertility is correlated with her body size [64] and/or choice may be based on genetic relatedness [65]. Here, we describe the first case of male mate choice in a marsupial to our knowledge, with male antechinus appearing disinterested in some females and ignoring their efforts to gain attention. Males prefer novel females rather than familiar previously-mated females in green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis; [64]), but familiarity with the female did not appear to influence male mate choice in the agile antechinus. Males re-mated with the same females if they stayed with them or re-entered the compartment. This was unexpected as males have a relatively small and finite number of spermatozoa available for insemination [66] and may be expected to maximise the number of females inseminated to increase their siring success. Male mate choice also did not appear to be affected by his level of genetic relatedness to the female nor by her fertility status which can be an influence in some species [67]. In oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus rhoads), males paired with preferred females had a greater siring success than those paired with non-preferred females based on compatibility of mates [68]. Here, females that were rejected by some males were accepted by others and successfully produced young, suggesting compatibility, rather than the fertility or attractiveness of the female, affected male choice. Female agonistic behaviour did not appear to deter males, a similar observation to that made by Shimmin et al. [37], and female body mass also did not appear to influence male choice or female reproductive success in this experiment with the lightest and heaviest females mating and no differences in weight between females that did and did not produce young. The reason(s) for the preference by male agile antechinus of certain females over others is not clear. The role of male mate choice and its effects on breeding success in the agile antechinus and other species warrants further examination. This research has provided new and important insights into the effects of genetic relatedness and female mate choice on siring success. It also provides new knowledge about the unusual mating system of the agile antechinus. Future studies of mate choice and its effects on reproductive success will shed light on the evolution of the mating system of the agile antechinus, which provides an interesting and useful paradigm for studies in other related species.AcknowledgmentsWe thank Michael Magrath for his assistance with statistics and the preparation of the manuscript.Author ContributionsConceived and designed the experiments: MLP SJW PDT-S. Performed the experiments: MLP. Analyzed the data: MLP SJW PDT-S LS. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: MLP.PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122381 April 29,13 /Mate Choice and Multiple Mating in AntechinusWrote the paper: MLP. Supervised MLP’s PhD research: SJW PDT-S LS. Edited the manuscript: SJW PDT-S LS
Health-related stigma is defined by Weiss and colleagues[1] as “a social process, experienced or anticipated, characterized by exclusion, rejection, blame or devaluation that results fromPLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0122478 April 21,1 /Stigma in Young Adults with Narcolepsyexperience, perception or reasonable anticipation of an adverse social judgment about a perso.