To have conversations about the purpose and focus of the project

To have conversations about the purpose and focus of the project and to plan next steps. During this time, there is a constant re-articulation of a vision. Such meetings, weInt J Law Psychiatry. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 September 01.Wood and BeierschmittPagesuggest, can be understood as “framing conversations”. Co-researchers include representatives of the Philadelphia Police Department, the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbilities, Center City District (a Business Improvement District), and the City of Philadelphia PhillyRising Collaborative. This research partnership was initiated by one of the authors from Temple University, with the simple premise of jointly exploring ideas for a “next wave” of police interventions with people affected by mental illness. The research collaborative has been, and continues to grow, as participants identify “webs of influence” (Braithwaite Drahos, 2000, p. 12) in the city and the people who can bring to bear distinct knowledge and experience. 2.1.1. Site location and methods–Philadelphia is a city of experimentation. Its criminal justice system demonstrates a longstanding commitment to the GS-5816 price diversion of people affected by mental illness and substance use. It began its CIT program in 2009, and as of 2011 had approximately 1000 trained officers (Evans, 2011). In 2012 it also initiated Mental Health First Aid, a twelve-hour training program for community members on how to identify and manage behavioral health situations (Department of Behavioural, 2013b). Additionally the city is home to a Mental Health Court (The First Judicial District of Pennsylvania, 2013). Overall, Philadelphia has numerous criminal justice “intercepts” (Munetz Griffin, 2006) ?formal points of treatment referral along the continuum of justice involvement from police intervention to reentry. With this backdrop, the research collaborative here set out to focus their inquiry on a part of Philadelphia known to have heightened behavioral health vulnerabilities ?Center City. A density map of police mental health transportations for 2010 produced by a police crime analyst confirmed participants’ concerns about behavioral health issues in this area. A larger set of transportation data was subsequently analyzed by the academic partner (see below). Through a prolonged Acadesine chemical information series of conversations it became clear that our analysis would not only encompass mental illness, but behavioral health more generally (including substance use) as well as homelessness. As police engaged in conversations, they emphasized the need to address connections between these co-occurring issues to problems of crime and disorder, including panhandling. All partners stressed the importance of focusing on the problem of “repeat utilization” of emergency resources, which prompted a spatial analysis of repeat police transportation pick-up locations (see below). After confirming the site location and conceptual focus of the inquiry, participants in the collaborative decided on a focus group method for capturing the perspectives and experiences of outreach workers and police officers on engagement challenges in Center City. The academic partner facilitated seven focus groups in total, all geared toward understanding existing street-level roles and frustrations as well as opportunities for interagency linkages. Co-researchers assisted with sampling and recruitment. Twenty-two different outreach workers participated in four focus groups1 (.To have conversations about the purpose and focus of the project and to plan next steps. During this time, there is a constant re-articulation of a vision. Such meetings, weInt J Law Psychiatry. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2015 September 01.Wood and BeierschmittPagesuggest, can be understood as “framing conversations”. Co-researchers include representatives of the Philadelphia Police Department, the Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual disAbilities, Center City District (a Business Improvement District), and the City of Philadelphia PhillyRising Collaborative. This research partnership was initiated by one of the authors from Temple University, with the simple premise of jointly exploring ideas for a “next wave” of police interventions with people affected by mental illness. The research collaborative has been, and continues to grow, as participants identify “webs of influence” (Braithwaite Drahos, 2000, p. 12) in the city and the people who can bring to bear distinct knowledge and experience. 2.1.1. Site location and methods–Philadelphia is a city of experimentation. Its criminal justice system demonstrates a longstanding commitment to the diversion of people affected by mental illness and substance use. It began its CIT program in 2009, and as of 2011 had approximately 1000 trained officers (Evans, 2011). In 2012 it also initiated Mental Health First Aid, a twelve-hour training program for community members on how to identify and manage behavioral health situations (Department of Behavioural, 2013b). Additionally the city is home to a Mental Health Court (The First Judicial District of Pennsylvania, 2013). Overall, Philadelphia has numerous criminal justice “intercepts” (Munetz Griffin, 2006) ?formal points of treatment referral along the continuum of justice involvement from police intervention to reentry. With this backdrop, the research collaborative here set out to focus their inquiry on a part of Philadelphia known to have heightened behavioral health vulnerabilities ?Center City. A density map of police mental health transportations for 2010 produced by a police crime analyst confirmed participants’ concerns about behavioral health issues in this area. A larger set of transportation data was subsequently analyzed by the academic partner (see below). Through a prolonged series of conversations it became clear that our analysis would not only encompass mental illness, but behavioral health more generally (including substance use) as well as homelessness. As police engaged in conversations, they emphasized the need to address connections between these co-occurring issues to problems of crime and disorder, including panhandling. All partners stressed the importance of focusing on the problem of “repeat utilization” of emergency resources, which prompted a spatial analysis of repeat police transportation pick-up locations (see below). After confirming the site location and conceptual focus of the inquiry, participants in the collaborative decided on a focus group method for capturing the perspectives and experiences of outreach workers and police officers on engagement challenges in Center City. The academic partner facilitated seven focus groups in total, all geared toward understanding existing street-level roles and frustrations as well as opportunities for interagency linkages. Co-researchers assisted with sampling and recruitment. Twenty-two different outreach workers participated in four focus groups1 (.