Ningful ways. After each activity we returned to our circle to

Ningful ways. After each activity we returned to our circle to engage in a collective conversation of specific ideas and perturbations that wereNursing Research and Practice intentionally crafted to “bump” into one another [6, 7, 28]. We believe the conversations were playful, valuing of difference, and a place where we were, for those conversational moments, relinquishing the certainty of our usual teaching practices [4]. We engaged as a collective knowledge-generating system, believing that the emergence of new learnings would arise. New understandings continued, through the recursive movement between an activity and coming together in conversations and with perturbations. After the conversation following the fourth activity, we revisited the concept of emergence and asked participants to record new critical questions, aha moments, understanding, puzzlements, and perturbations. A final discussion ensued, guided by a line of creative inquiry [29]. Prior to describing the final discussion, we turn to the four Chaetocin web activities that included completion of a teachinglearning narrative; assembling fractal art puzzles; an exploration of liberating-constraints; and selection of complexity concepts. Recall that our colleagues were asked to consider the four activities and chose how and in what order to engage them. We stayed in somewhat of an observant stance with our colleagues as they considered the activities and began a process of engagement.3 Researchers have documented favorable outcomes when faculty create and participate in critical and reflective dialogues about teaching [30, 31]. Participants heard various strategies to teaching-learning from one another, as we all explored the inventive side of pedagogy when education is not prescriptive but open and engaging. 6.2. Fractal Art Puzzles. Another activity involved fractal art puzzles. Fractals offer visual representation of AC220 supplier selforganization, recursiveness, and beauty. We gathered images of fractals and cut images into pieces and asked the group to see how many picture puzzles they could solve as a group in the time allotted. The group of 10 participants decided to work on the fractals as a whole. How they chose to reassemble and reimagine the art was up to them; however, they were constrained to the cut-up pieces of fractals provided to them. Some group members moved to rearranging the pieces while others commented and advised over shoulders. A few decided that it would be interesting to combine two of the fractals to create a new entity. Three of the four puzzles were easily solved as participants recognized the self-similar patterns. But the fourth puzzle was more complex with so many self-similar patterns that colleagues could not make sense of the whole. Some people had the hands on action while others made suggestions from outside the circle. The fractal was not successfully reconstructed but it created a great deal of discussion, laughter, and learning as a question arose, “Does every puzzle have an answer?” It also surfaced the realization that sometimes patterns are not recognized, and the larger whole can be illusive and hidden. And yet, it is there, waiting to be seen. With the intent of exploring the learning of the collective after the fractal activity, the following questions were asked when we reconvened in our conversation circle. (i) How did you work together as a group to solve the puzzles? (ii) What was it like to work in relationship and to respond to this inquiry of fract.Ningful ways. After each activity we returned to our circle to engage in a collective conversation of specific ideas and perturbations that wereNursing Research and Practice intentionally crafted to “bump” into one another [6, 7, 28]. We believe the conversations were playful, valuing of difference, and a place where we were, for those conversational moments, relinquishing the certainty of our usual teaching practices [4]. We engaged as a collective knowledge-generating system, believing that the emergence of new learnings would arise. New understandings continued, through the recursive movement between an activity and coming together in conversations and with perturbations. After the conversation following the fourth activity, we revisited the concept of emergence and asked participants to record new critical questions, aha moments, understanding, puzzlements, and perturbations. A final discussion ensued, guided by a line of creative inquiry [29]. Prior to describing the final discussion, we turn to the four activities that included completion of a teachinglearning narrative; assembling fractal art puzzles; an exploration of liberating-constraints; and selection of complexity concepts. Recall that our colleagues were asked to consider the four activities and chose how and in what order to engage them. We stayed in somewhat of an observant stance with our colleagues as they considered the activities and began a process of engagement.3 Researchers have documented favorable outcomes when faculty create and participate in critical and reflective dialogues about teaching [30, 31]. Participants heard various strategies to teaching-learning from one another, as we all explored the inventive side of pedagogy when education is not prescriptive but open and engaging. 6.2. Fractal Art Puzzles. Another activity involved fractal art puzzles. Fractals offer visual representation of selforganization, recursiveness, and beauty. We gathered images of fractals and cut images into pieces and asked the group to see how many picture puzzles they could solve as a group in the time allotted. The group of 10 participants decided to work on the fractals as a whole. How they chose to reassemble and reimagine the art was up to them; however, they were constrained to the cut-up pieces of fractals provided to them. Some group members moved to rearranging the pieces while others commented and advised over shoulders. A few decided that it would be interesting to combine two of the fractals to create a new entity. Three of the four puzzles were easily solved as participants recognized the self-similar patterns. But the fourth puzzle was more complex with so many self-similar patterns that colleagues could not make sense of the whole. Some people had the hands on action while others made suggestions from outside the circle. The fractal was not successfully reconstructed but it created a great deal of discussion, laughter, and learning as a question arose, “Does every puzzle have an answer?” It also surfaced the realization that sometimes patterns are not recognized, and the larger whole can be illusive and hidden. And yet, it is there, waiting to be seen. With the intent of exploring the learning of the collective after the fractal activity, the following questions were asked when we reconvened in our conversation circle. (i) How did you work together as a group to solve the puzzles? (ii) What was it like to work in relationship and to respond to this inquiry of fract.